Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island

Short-beaked Common Dolphin

By: A. H. Kopelman, Ph.D.


Short-beaked Common Dolphin

Short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis)

 

D. delphis social group

The short-beaked common dolphin is one of the most abundant dolphins in the Western North Atlantic, with an estimated 70,184 individuals. The dolphin is usually found in small social groups of between 10 and 20, but can be found in larger aggregations of hundreds (or thousands).


 

Their distinctive side colors with V-shaped dark cape and hourglass pattern with a yellow/tan anterior section, are characteristic.

Adult D. delphis are 7.5 - 8.5 feet in length and may weigh up to 300 lbs. Calfs are about 32 in. at birth. and feeds on mother's milk for 4 months. Common dolphins reach sexual maturity at 3-5 years of age and may live until 35 year old.


Common dolphins are nomadic and can be found swimming and porpoising throughout the world's oceans in sub-tropical to temperate waters including New York.

 

Short-beaked common dolphin, porpoising awayD. delphis feed on a variety of prey items, including herring, mackerel, and squid. The female age of first reproduction  is 9 years, with an interbirth interval of 2.1 years. The age of last reproduction is about 26 years for these dolphins

 D. delphis feed on a variety of prey items, including herring, mackerel, and squid. The female age of first reproduction  is 9 years, with an interbirth interval of 2.1 years. The age of last reproduction is about 26 years for these dolphins.


Mom and calf Short-beaked Common Dolphins

 Notice the mom and calf to the left. 

The calf (on the right) is relatively new and still has visible fetal folds (the white vertical lines).

RELATED SITES

CRESLI photos of Short-beaked Common Dolphins
Society for Marine Mammalogy's Short-beaked common dolphin page